What is bladder Cancer? | Article and News
TELEPHONE NUMBERS
    

JOIN eCarePlanet

  • Review hospital information
  • Check doctors Resumes 
  • Compare Treatment costs
  • Tele Consult, Talk, eMail, Chat with doctors
  • Get Free Quotes & Medical Case Manager assistance
  • Match doctors,hospital & Facilities for your care
  • Book Tele consultation, Hospital &Treatments
  • Upload,Share, Retrieve Medical documents, Scans
  • Book Travel tickets, Hotels
  • Private Nurse, assistant
  • Insurances & Loans

            

    WATCH VIDEOS

    Columbia Asia
    Category:Hospitals videos
    American\´s knee replacement surgery testimonial India
    Category:Testimonial Videos
    Fortis Hospitals :Changing the Face of Indian Healthcare
    Category:Hospitals videos
    What is bladder Cancer?

    What is the Bladder?
    The bladder is part of the urinary tract that transports and stores urine. Urine is the liquid produced by the kidneys as they remove waste and water from the blood. Urine travels from the kidney down a narrow tube, the ureter, and is stored in a balloon-like structure, the bladder.

    What is bladder Cancer?

    The inside, or lining, of the bladder is composed of a layer of cells that protect the tissues beneath them from contact with urine. Occasionally, these cells start to multiply uncontrollably and form a growth or tumour.

    When found and treated in the early stages, cancerous bladder tumors are not likely to be life threatening. In addition, treatment of most of these tumors does not require removal of the bladder. Prompt medical attention and regular checkups are necessary to treat bladder tumors and to watch for new growths.

    Who is at risk of getting bladder cancer?

    Bladder cancer is unusual in people under 40 years of age. Men are affected 5 times more often than women, and cigarette smokers have an increased risk of developing bladder cancer. Exposure to certain chemicals in the workplace also has been associated with an increased risk of developing bladder cancer.

    Cystoscopy

    In cystoscopy, a pencil-thin, telescope-like instrument (cystoscope) with a light source and magnifying lenses is inserted gently into the urethra and passed into the       bladder to examine its lining. The cystoscope also permits the urologist to remove a tissue sample for biopsy.

    How is bladder cancer treated?

    The treatment for bladder cancer depends on how deeply the tumour has grown into the bladder wall. If the growth is superficial, i.e., it is confined to the bladder wall, the tumour is usually removed with an instrument called a resectoscope. Removal of a bladder tumour in this way is referred to as transurethral resection.

    Who is at risk of getting bladder cancer?

    Bladder cancer is unusual in people under 40 years of age. Men are affected 5 times more often than women, and cigarette smokers have an increased risk of developing bladder cancer. Exposure to certain chemicals in the workplace also has been associated with an increased risk of developing bladder cancer.

    What are the signs of bladder cancer?

    The earliest clue that you may have a bladder tumour is the presence of blood in your urine. You may or may not see the blood. Sometimes it can only be spotted under a microscope. People with kidney stones or urinary tract infections and men with enlarged prostate glands may also have blood in their urine. It is therefore important to find out the underlying cause in each case of having blood in the urine. Blood in the urine is usually not accompanied by pain, for those with bladder cancer.

    How is bladder cancer detected?

    Your doctor will probably refer you to a urologist, a doctor who specializes in diseases of the urinary system and the male reproductive system, who will then perform further tests for you.

    All of the tests below may be performed by an urologist without requiring you to stay overnight in a hospital or to have anesthesia (medication that puts you to sleep):

    An intravenous urogram (IVU)

    An intravenous urogram (IVU) is a test in which a special liquid called a “contrast solution” injected into a vein passes quickly into the urine. X-rays of the urinary system as the contrast solution is excreted allows the urologist to see images of the kidneys, ureters, and bladder.

    Will further treatment be needed?

    If the doctor believes that you are likely to develop new cancer, you may be advised to undergo additional treatments like having medications instilled into the bladder.

    Some bladder cancers are invasive, meaning that it has grown through the bladder lining into the bladder wall. In such cases, the urologist may recommend that the bladder be completely removed. This operation is called a cystectomy. The doctor may            also recommend additional treatment       with x-rays and drugs.

    Regular follow up is required because bladder cancers often recur, especially within the first year or two after discovery of the first cancer. Because tumours can recur, it is important for the urologist to look into your bladder regularly with a cystoscope and to inspect cells from your urine with a microscope.

    Educational material published as part of community service by:

     DEPARTMENT OF URO-ONCOLOGY
    NU HOSPITAL 
    C. A. 6, 15th MAIN, 11th CROSS, PADMANABHANAGAR
    BANGALORE – 560 070
    (: +91-80-42489999
    Fax: +91-80-26392693
    E-mail: info@nuhospitals.com